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Research Papers

Graphene Oxide Colloidal Suspensions as Cutting Fluids for Micromachining—Part I: Fabrication and Performance Evaluation

[+] Author and Article Information
Bryan Chu

Department of Mechanical Aerospace and
Nuclear Engineering,
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute,
110 8th Street,
Troy, NY 12180
e-mail: chub3@rpi.edu

Eklavya Singh

Department of Mechanical Aerospace and
Nuclear Engineering,
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute,
110 8th Street,
Troy, NY 12180
e-mail: singhe2@rpi.edu

Johnson Samuel

Assistant Professor
Department of Mechanical Aerospace and
Nuclear Engineering,
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute,
110 8th Street,
Troy, NY 12180
e-mail: samuej2@rpi.edu

Nikhil Koratkar

Professor
Department of Mechanical Aerospace and
Nuclear Engineering,
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute,
110 8th Street,
Troy, NY 12180
e-mail: koratn@rpi.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MICRO- AND NANO-MANUFACTURING. Manuscript received May 7, 2015; final manuscript received July 14, 2015; published online August 21, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Sangkee Min.

J. Micro Nano-Manuf 3(4), 041002 (Aug 21, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: JMNM-15-1031; doi: 10.1115/1.4031135 History: Received May 07, 2015; Revised July 14, 2015

This paper is aimed at investigating the effects of graphene oxide platelet (GOP) geometry (i.e., lateral size and thickness) and oxygen functionalization on the cooling and lubrication performance of GOP colloidal suspensions. The techniques of thermal reduction and ultrasonic exfoliation were used to manufacture three different types of GOPs. For each of these three types of GOPs, colloidal solutions with GOP concentrations varying between 0.1 and 1 wt.% were evaluated for their dynamic viscosity, thermal conductivity, and micromachining performance. The ultrasonically exfoliated GOPs (with 2–3 graphene layers and lowest in-solution characteristic lateral length of 120 nm) appear to be the most favorable for micromachining applications. Even at the lowest concentration of 0.1 wt.%, they are capable of providing a 51% reduction in the cutting temperature and a 25% reduction in the surface roughness value over that of the baseline semisynthetic cutting fluid. For the thermally reduced GOPs (TR GOPs) (with 4–8 graphene layers and in-solution characteristic lateral length of 562–2780 nm), a concentration of 0.2 wt.% appears to be optimal. The findings suggest that the differences seen between the colloidal suspensions in terms of their droplet spreading, evaporation, and the subsequent GOP film-formation characteristics may be better indicators of their machining performance, as opposed to their bulk fluid properties.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 3

SEM images of GOPs: (a) TR500, (b) TR1050, and (c) US

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Fig. 2

X-ray diffraction data of GO

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Fig. 1

Overall process flow for preferred methods of GOP production

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Fig. 4

DLS data showing the statistical distribution of various GOP sizes: (a) TR500, (b) TR1050, and (c) US

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Fig. 5

BET adsorption–desorption isotherms for TR GOP powders

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Fig. 7

Cutting temperature and cutting force trends seen for the GOP colloidal solutions (note: thermocouple measurements have a repeatability of ±0.1 °C and dry cutting conditions gave a temperature rise of 35 °C): (a) percent difference in maximum temperature rise compared to baseline cutting fluid and (b) resultant cutting force trends

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Fig. 8

Surface roughness trends seen for GOP colloidal solutions

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Fig. 6

Experimental setup with inset showing thermocouple bead location [18]: (A) high-speed spindle, (B) workpiece, (C) Y-Z stage of machine, (D) CBN tool, (E) dynamometer, (F) X stage of machine, (G) cutting fluid dispensing syringe, and (H) thermocouple

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