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Research Papers

Fracture Energy Evaluation Using J-Integral in Orthogonal Microcutting

[+] Author and Article Information
Dattatraya Parle, Ramesh K. Singh

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology Bombay,
Mumbai 400076, India

Suhas S. Joshi

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology Bombay,
Mumbai 400076, India
e-mail: ssjoshi@me.iitb.ac.in

1Present address: Infosys Limited, Pune 411057, India.

2Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MICRO- AND NANO-MANUFACTURING. Manuscript received July 2, 2015; final manuscript received September 16, 2015; published online October 20, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Sangkee Min.

J. Micro Nano-Manuf 4(1), 011002 (Oct 20, 2015) (9 pages) Paper No: JMNM-15-1042; doi: 10.1115/1.4031667 History: Received July 02, 2015; Revised September 16, 2015

Fracture in cutting of ductile as well as brittle materials can be characterized using parameters such as K, G, R, and J-integral; of these, R has been widely used. To accurately evaluate the contribution of fracture energy in total cutting energy, J-integral would provide a more comprehensive basis as it encompasses several fracture modes, material plasticity, and nonlinear behavior. Therefore, this work adopts J-integral to evaluate the contribution of fracture energy to the size effect during microcutting of AISI 1215 steel. The work uses explicit integration method within ansys/ls-dyna to simulate two-dimensional (2D) orthogonal microcutting. U- and V-shaped cutting edges were used to represent a sharp crack-tip and a blunt crack-tip, respectively. Considering several alternative contours around crack-tip, covering the plastic zone, J-integral was calculated. Upon benchmarking J-integral values with other simulations in the literature, the approach was adopted for microcutting simulations in this work. It is observed that J-integral increases with uncut chip thickness, whereas it decreases with cutting speed, rake angle, and tool edge radius. The term (J/t0) defines contribution of fracture to the size effect in terms of J-integral, which is in the range of 4–24% under various parametric conditions. The corresponding values of R were always found to lie above those of the J-integral indicating that J-integral is relatively more appropriate parameter to quantify the fracture energy during microcutting.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Possible two modes of fracture during orthogonal cutting

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Fig. 2

(a) and (b) Comparison between plastic deformation zone of double-notched fracture test specimens and the shear zone of microcutting [14]. Contour path is shown around the tool-tip including shear zone.

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Fig. 3

J-integral terminologies illustrated: (a) contour path without crack face traction around the crack-tip and (b) contour path including crack face traction ahead of the tool-tip during metal cutting

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Fig. 5

(a) VM stress distribution and (b) plastic strain distribution (process parameters: V = 3 m/min, α = 5 deg, t0 = 75 μm, tool-up sharp)

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Fig. 6

Variation of cutting force: (a) uncut chip thickness, (b) tool edge radius, (c) rake angle, and (d) cutting speed

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Fig. 7

Crack-tip types: (a) V-notch and (b) U-notch

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Fig. 8

(a) and (b) Typical contour path around the crack-tip

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Fig. 9

Flow chart to evaluate J-integral

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Fig. 10

Variation of J-integral during microcutting of AISI 1215: (a) uncut chip thickness, (b) cutting speed, (c) rake angle, and (d) tool edge radius

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Fig. 11

VM stress and contour path ahead of tool-tip during microcutting of ceramics (process parameters: V = 1800 m/min, α = 0 deg, t0 = 2 μm, tool-up sharp)

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Fig. 12

(a)–(l) Contribution of fracture energy to specific cutting energy using J-integral

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Fig. 13

Comparison of J-integral and R during microcutting of AISI125: (a) uncut chip thickness, (b) cutting speed, (c) rake angle, and (d) tool edge radius

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