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Research Papers

Development of a Hybrid Thermoplastic Forming Process for the Manufacture of Curvilinear Surgical Blades From Bulk Metallic Glass

[+] Author and Article Information
James Zhu

Department of Mechanical Science
and Engineering,
University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign,
Urbana, IL 61801

Shiv G. Kapoor

Department of Mechanical Science
and Engineering,
University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign,
Urbana, IL 61801
e-mail: sgkapoor@illinois.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MICRO- AND NANO-MANUFACTURING. Manuscript received June 1, 2016; final manuscript received November 14, 2016; published online January 6, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Ulf Engel.

J. Micro Nano-Manuf 5(1), 011003 (Jan 06, 2017) (14 pages) Paper No: JMNM-16-1022; doi: 10.1115/1.4035389 History: Received June 01, 2016; Revised November 14, 2016

A hybrid thermoplastic forming process involving sequential micromolding and microdrawing operations is developed to manufacture the multifacet/curvilinear geometries found on most surgical blades. This is accomplished through an oblique drawing technique, i.e., drawing with a nonzero inclination angle. By applying time-varying force profiles during the drawing operation, a wide range of complex blade geometries is possible. Experiments have exhibited positive results across several multifacet and curvilinear blade geometries. Manufacturing process capabilities are quantitatively evaluated and experimental results have measured the bulk metallic glass (BMG) blade cutting edge radii to be consistently less than 15 nm, rake face surface roughness Ra to be on the order of 20 nm, and edge straightness deviations to be less than 5 μm root-mean-square (RMS) while retaining an amorphous atomic structure.

Copyright © 2017 by ASME
Topics: Blades
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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Hybrid thermoplastic forming process diagram (adapted from Ref. [3])

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Fig. 2

Top view schematic of microdrawing process: (a) single-facet drawing and (b) oblique drawing

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Fig. 3

Curvilinear blades with varying inclination angle

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Fig. 4

Oblique drawing of crescent blade: (a) force diagram and (b) failure initiation and propagation

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Fig. 5

Configuration of hybrid thermoplastic forming testbed for multifacet/curvilinear blades

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Fig. 6

Lever arm variables and constants

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Fig. 7

Linear guide rail stage variables and constants

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Fig. 8

Molding die manufactured by the rough end milling, die-sinking EDM, and grinding processes

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Fig. 9

Dual linear stage configuration for drawing module

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Fig. 10

Voice coil-driven drawing actuator

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Fig. 11

Initial BMG sample: (a) sample dimensions (mm) and (b) bi-axial drawing configuration with notched sample

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Fig. 12

Supervisory control architecture

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Fig. 13

Representation of expected response during supervisory control: (a) expected response during drawing operation and (b) expected response during interpolation step

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Fig. 14

Manufactured blade geometries (mm): (a) 90 deg lancet blade, (b) 45 deg lancet blade, and (c) crescent blade

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Fig. 15

Scanning electron microscope (SEM) top view of multifacet edge formation, dotted line marks the start of drawing deformation [F = 15 N, v = 0.2 mm/s]

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Fig. 16

SEM oblique perspective view of 90 deg lancet blade, dotted line marks the start of drawing deformation [F = 30 N, v = 0.5 mm/s]

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Fig. 17

SEM images of 45 deg lancet blade morphology, dotted line marks the start of drawing deformation

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Fig. 18

Qualitative blade geometry repeatability for 45 deg lancet blades, dotted line marks the start of drawing deformation

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Fig. 19

A 45 deg lancet LSR fit and included angle measurement

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Fig. 20

Repeatability for 45 deg lancet blades [F = 50 N, v = 2.10 mm/s]: (a) force profiles and (b) velocity profiles

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Fig. 21

FIB cutting edge cross section of a 45 deg lancet blade and edge radius measurement: (a) 20,000× magnification and (b) 200,000× magnification

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Fig. 22

Blade straightness orientations for evaluation (adapted from Ref. [3])

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Fig. 23

Top view (X–Y plane) straightness measurement: (a) stitched images with coordinate data of edge location and (b) least squares regression fit of coordinate data

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Fig. 24

Side view (X–Z plane) straightness measurement: (a) stitched images with coordinate data of edge location and (b) least squares regression fit of coordinate data

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Fig. 25

Top view preliminary crescent blade tests with 1 mm/s velocity limit, dotted line marks the start of drawing deformation: (a) F˙ = 5 N/s, (b) F˙ = 7 N/s, and (c) F˙ = 10 N/s

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Fig. 26

Crescent blade tests with 25 μm mold gap with F˙ = 7 N/s and 1 mm/s velocity limit, dotted line marks the start of drawing deformation

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Fig. 27

Crescent blade [ F˙ = 7 N/s, v = 1.0 mm/s]: (a) force profile and (b) velocity profile

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Fig. 28

Localized TEM analysis of a 45 deg lancet blade cutting edge: (a) cross section image and (b) selected area diffraction pattern of BMG material—diffuse ring pattern is characteristic of amorphous atomic structure

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