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Research Papers

An Exploratory Investigation of the Mechanical Properties of the Nanostructured Porous Materials Deposited by Laser-Induced Chemical Solution Synthesis

[+] Author and Article Information
Cheng Peng

School of Industrial Engineering,
Purdue University,
West Lafayette, IN 47907
e-mail: peng14@purdue.edu

C. Richard Liu

School of Industrial Engineering,
Purdue University,
West Lafayette, IN 47907
e-mail: liuch@purdue.edu

Rohit Voothaluru

School of Industrial Engineering,
Purdue University,
West Lafayette, IN 47907
e-mail: rohit.voothaluru@gmail.com

Chun-Yu Ou

School of Industrial Engineering,
Purdue University,
West Lafayette, IN 47907
e-mail: ou1@purdue.edu

Zhikun Liu

School of Industrial Engineering,
Purdue University,
West Lafayette, IN 47907
e-mail: liuzhikun@scut.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MICRO- AND NANO-MANUFACTURING. Manuscript received October 1, 2016; final manuscript received February 17, 2017; published online March 24, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Don A. Lucca.

J. Micro Nano-Manuf 5(2), 021007 (Mar 24, 2017) (8 pages) Paper No: JMNM-16-1059; doi: 10.1115/1.4036037 History: Received October 01, 2016; Revised February 17, 2017

Laser-induced chemical solution synthesis has been recently developed as a new generic method to create porous nanostructured materials for complex and miniaturized devices. The material made by this approach is successfully demonstrated for electrochemical catalytic, nanoscale powders, protective coatings, and other applications. One question has therefore been raised: What are the mechanical properties of the porous materials deposited by the laser-induced chemical solution synthesis? This paper has attempted to explore the mechanical properties of such porous nanostructured materials deposited by this new nanomanufacturing method. This process also offers an innovative opportunity to study the strength of a very simple bonding in additive manufacturing. A thin-film of copper nanoparticles is deposited on copper substrates; then, the microstructure of the deposited film is characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), and mechanical properties are investigated by a variety of experiments, such as microhardness test, nano-indentation test, bending test, and adhesion test. The mechanical properties of substrates with surface deposition have been shown to have adequate bond strength (>60 g/mm) to allow effective usage in intended applications. Based on the test results, statistical regression and significant tests have also been carried out. A new model for the nano-indentation of the porous coating (film) is proposed. The empirical results have shown that the effect of coating thickness is more prominent on mechanical properties in the case of thick coating deposition.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Sample 1 and SEM images of its 3 μm coating: (a) overview of the sample and nano-indent area as boxed, (b) top view of the surface (30,000×) within the indent area, (c) side view of the cross section (4000×), and (d) side view of the cross section (7000×)

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Fig. 2

Sample 4 and SEM image of its 8 μm coating: (a) overview of the sample and nano-indent area as boxed and (b) side view of the cross section (3000×)

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Fig. 3

Load profile: applied load versus time

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Fig. 4

Load versus indentation depth recorded for copper substrate as-received

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Fig. 5

Hardness versus depth under five different applied loads: (a) substrate as-received, (b) sample 1, (c) sample 4 (center region), and (d) sample 4 (transition region)

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Fig. 6

Modulus versus depth under 4000 μN applied load for different samples: (a) substrate as-received, (b) sample 1, (c) sample 4 (center region), and (d) sample 4 (transition region)

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Fig. 7

Sample 4 and SEM images of its 8 μm coating after 700,000 cycles: (a) overview of the sample, (b) top view (600×) of the indicated (boxed) area in (a), (c) top view (1100×) of the indicated (boxed) area in (b), and (d) top view (8000×) of the indicated (boxed) area in (c)

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Fig. 8

SEM images of 8 μm coating (sample 4) after 1 × 106 cycles (top view)

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Fig. 9

Average hardness versus contact depth under five different loads

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Fig. 10

Average modulus versus contact depth under five different loads

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