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research-article

Structure of Electrospray Printed Deposits for Short Spray Times

[+] Author and Article Information
Nicholas A. Brown

Department of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY, USA
nbrown14@binghamton.edu

Yaqun Zhu

Department of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY, USA
yzhu88@binghamton.edu

Ao Li

Department of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY, USA
ali47@binghamton.edu

Mingfei Zhao

Department of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY, USA
mzhao21@binghamton.edu

Xin Yong

Department of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY, USA
xyong@binghamton.edu

Paul R. Chiarot

Department of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY, USA
pchiarot@binghamton.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4037695 History: Received June 20, 2017; Revised August 05, 2017

Abstract

In electrospray printing, a plume of highly charged droplets is created from a conductive ink. Printing occurs by positioning a target substrate in the path of the emitted material. Here, the ink used is a colloidal dispersion consisting of nanoparticles suspended in a volatile solvent. The selection of a volatile solvent allows for rapid evaporation of the droplets in-flight to produce dry nanoparticles. A net electric charge is imparted on the emitted particles during electrospray. The interaction of this charge with the global electric field and with other charged particles/droplets governs the particles' trajectory and determines the microstructure of the printed deposit. In this study, we characterized the structure of nanoparticle deposits printed using electrospray for deposits with low particle count. During printing, the target substrate was (i) held stationary and (ii) translated with various short spray times and substrate velocities, respectively. Examination of both a static and translating target substrate provided fundamental insights into the printing process. Electrospray printing is capable of exerting much finer control over microstructure compared to other printing techniques. This has significant implications for the manufacturing of thin-films.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
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