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Technical Brief

A study of scratch speed effects on ductile-brittle transition in silicon

[+] Author and Article Information
Chirag Alreja

Research scholar, Manufacturing Engineering Section, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, India
alrejachirag5621@gmail.com

Sathyan Subbiah

Associate professor, Manufacturing Engineering Section, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, India
sathyans@iitm.ac.in

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4043647 History: Received November 08, 2018; Revised April 22, 2019

Abstract

A unique rotational double-taper scratching set up is used to study ductile brittle transitions in single crystal (100) p-type silicon using a conical diamond tool at room temperature and scratching speeds ranging between 0.1 m/s to 0.3 m/s. In such a setup, transition from brittle to ductile occurs twice in a single tapered scratch, during tool entry and tool exit. A well-defined way to determine critical depth of cut via linear crack density per unit crack length is proposed. The scratches were studied using scanning electron microscopy (morphology) and white light interferometry (depth measurements). A comprehensive study of critical depth of cut, compiled from the literature together with data from the present study, with scratching speeds from very low to high show that critical depth of cut decreases from very low scratch speeds to medium scratch speeds and then increases again at very high scratch speeds. An inference from this study is that diamond turning should be conducted at higher cutting speeds than being undertaken today to make use of larger critical depths of cut.

Copyright (c) 2019 by ASME
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