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Technical Brief

Characterisation of zirconia-based ceramics after micro-grinding

[+] Author and Article Information
Pablo Fook

Laboratory for Precision Machining (LFM), Leibniz Institute for Materials Engineering (IWT), MAPEX Center for Materials and Processes, University of Bremen, Badgasteiner Straße 2, 28359 Bremen, Germany
fook@iwt.uni-bremen.de

Oltmann Riemer

Laboratory for Precision Machining (LFM), Leibniz Institute for Materials Engineering (IWT), MAPEX Center for Materials and Processes, University of Bremen, Badgasteiner Straße 2, 28359 Bremen, Germany
riemer@iwt.uni-bremen.de

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4043693 History: Received November 07, 2018; Revised April 18, 2019

Abstract

Despite the recent developments of ductile mode machining, micro-grinding of bioceramics can cause an insufficient surface and subsurface integrity due to the inherent hardness and brittleness of such materials. This work aims to determine the influence of a two-step grinding operation on zirconia-based ceramics. In this regard, zirconia (ZrO2) and zirconia toughened alumina (ZTA) specimens are ground with ultrasonic vibration assistance concerning different diamond grain sizes and a variation of the machining parameters. White light interferometry, scanning electron microscope, x-ray diffraction and 4-point bending tests are performed to evaluate surface roughness, microstructure, residual stresses and flexural strength respectively. The strategy applied suggests that the finished parts are suitable for certain biomedical uses like dental implants due to their optimum surface roughness. Moreover, concerning the mechanical properties, an increase of the flexural strength and compressive residual stresses of ground ZrO2 and ZTA workpieces were observed in comparison to the as-received specimens. These results, as well as the methodology prosed to investigate the surface integrity of the ground workpieces, are helpful to understand the bioceramic materials response under micro-grinding conditions and to set further machining investigations.

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